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Rocky Mountain Railroad

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Canadian Pacific Railway

Nick Beyer

Roadmaster Mountain Subdivision
At 33 years old, Nick Beyer is one of the youngest roadmasters on the line. He was promoted from track inspector in 2016. A self-proclaimed workaholic, he’s responsible for 90 miles of mountain track and can go months without taking a day off. Nick originally hails from Vancouver Island and has a wry sense of humour that [most of] his colleagues enjoy. He’s single, without dependents, save for a fat black St. Bernard/Lab cross named Hugo, ten hens and a rooster, which he keeps in a barn in his backyard.
 
Canadian Pacific Railway

Roch Beland

Roadmaster Thompson Subdivision
Roch Beland may come across as a joker, but he takes his job extremely seriously. Last year Roch got bumped up to Roadmaster and is now in charge of one of the busiest stretches of railroad on the mountain line. He used to specialize in switch replacements -- large-scale, high-pressure jobs – so he’s familiar with working under extreme stress. He blows off steam by giving his colleagues the gears and they love giving it right back to him. But when it’s time to work, no one is more focused. He prefers getting his hands dirty to sending emails so you’re more likely to find him patrolling the track than in the office.
 
Canadian Pacific Railway

Alina Miller

General Foreman for BC Rail #1
Alina Miller is a tough-talking foreman for the track replacement teams, also known as the gangs. Working on the gangs is down and dirty work and Alina fits right in with the guys who call her boss. As a winner of Canadian Pacific Railroad’s network-wide spike driving competition, she proved that a woman can swing a hammer just as well as the next guy. But it’s not just her tough attitude that keeps the boys in check, it’s her passion for the job. After spending years working jobs that required high heels, nylons and hair spray, Alina loves the freedom, the fresh air and an honest day’s work.  At just 34 years old she has already reached the highest paid unionized position CP has to offer. And she’s only just beginning.
Canadian Pacific Railway

Chad Deschamps

Revelstoke Roadmaster
Chad Deschamps grew up in a railroading family, so he knew what he was getting into when he signed on to the Canadian Pacific Railroad at sixteen years old. He worked his way up the ladder from labourer and is now responsible for one of the toughest stretches of track in the Rocky Mountains. He’s often on duty long after every everyone else is tucked in bed. While Chad is married to the railway, he still finds time to spend with his three children. In his down-time he likes to go fishing, but he always keeps his cell phone on, just in case. Little known fact: Chad has a pet goose that barks like a dog.  
 
Canadian Pacific Railway

Jordan Hunter

Locomotive Engineer
Jordy’s love of trains is in his blood. His family roots trace back to his great great great great uncle, Robert Stevenson, who invented a steam locomotive called The Rocket in 1829. As a child growing up in the Rockies, Jordy Hunter used to wave at the train crews hoping they would blow their horns, dreaming of one day becoming a locomotive engineer himself. He finally achieved his dream. Now, he wears his traditional striped railroad engineer’s hat with pride every day. Jordy is a walking encyclopedia when it comes to Canadian Pacific Railroad history and is always happy to regale those around him with stories of the glorious by-gone era.
 
 
Canadian Pacific Railway

James “Jimmy-the-Wizard” Taylor

Track Replacement Team
Jimmy joined the track replacement gang a year ago looking for a fresh start. Before that, he worked on Chad Deschamps’s crew in Revelstoke, but his poor focus washed up his chances for promotion. Jimmy’s dream has always been to become a full-time magician, which made him reluctant to fully devote himself to the railroad. But working on the gangs has been good for Jimmy. He’s made friends, enjoys the hard work and has decided that he’s going to give the railroad a real shot. As a symbol of his new commitment, he had his employee number tattooed onto his arm. But will his new-found resolve last? 


 
Canadian Pacific Railway

Amanda Symak

Assistant Machine Operator
Three years ago, Amanda was riding her bike to work as a legal secretary in downtown in Vancouver when she decided she was tired of looking up at concrete. Through persistence and ingenuity, she landed a job with the railroad. When Amanda started she wasn’t even sure if her truck was a four-wheel drive. Since then she’s been on a steep curve learning the mechanics of railroad machinery. In her off-time she likes to sit in silence amongst the trees, with her cell phone switched off, and read.

 
 
Canadian Pacific Railway

John “Pops” Popplewell

Snowplow
Born and raised in a Rocky Mountain railway family, John is in his final year on the railroad after 34 years of service. One of the perks of his seniority is bidding for the lighter jobs, and that’s why you’ll most often see him behind the snowplow where he daydreams about his retirement plans.
 
Ontario Northland Railway

Sheldon Renaud

Locomotive Engineer
Sheldon has been working as an engineer on the Ontario Northland Railway since 2005. Before that, he worked in the hospitality industry as a bartender and waiter. Sheldon grew up in Englehart, Ontario, a small community with less than 1500 residents. As an engineer on a small northern railroad, he does everything from mending broken train parts to baggage handling. He counts himself lucky to have landed a job where he can snap pictures of spectacular sunsets and watch the Northern Lights dance over the frozen tundra.
 
Ontario Northland Railway

Jodie Nichols

ONR Rookie Conductor
Jodie is the third generation of her family to work for the Ontario Northland Railway, after her father and great grandfather. She was destined to follow in those footsteps from an early age. Jodie attended the Railroad Conductor Program at Confederation College in Thunder Bay. In 2016 she landed a position as a conductor trainee for the ONR and that was the day she made her family proud. Attracted by the outdoors and the physical side of the job, she is undaunted by the long hours and time away from home.
 
Ontario Northland Railway

Jay Falldien

ONR Conductor
An adventure-seeking outdoorsman, Jay spends all week working the Polar Bear Express. Jay now lives in Cochrane, but is originally from North Bay. Jay has been working as a conductor for the ONR for 15 years and has loved this job from day one. He always has a smile on his face, no matter what’s happening on the tracks. He’s a first generation railroader and has three kids 20, 15, and 13.


 
 
Ontario Northland Railway

William Tozer

Off-gridder
William is a local legend on the Ontario Northland Railway line. He learned to trap and hunt from his First Nations mother and her family. Today he spends most of his time at his family camp at Mile 131, trapping beavers with his son Ben. Recently, he and some of his friends pitched in and built a solar-powered community centre at Mile 131. William wanted to provide a space where local youths could practice the old ways of First Nation life, including hunting, trapping, fishing, beadwork and storytelling. With the help of the Ontario Northland Railway, William managed to ship nine tons of lumber and supplies from Cochrane, to build the centre.
 
Ontario Northland Railway

George Ross

Off-gridder
Like any tenacious entrepreneur, George Ross saw a need and filled it. Electric power is expensive in the north and the winter season is long and cold, so George decided to start a firewood business. It’s not easy work. Along with his son, he fells the trees near his family camp at Mile 69 and chops the wood himself. Then he transports the wood north on the Ontario Northland Railway and delivers it by snowmobile to remote areas. Demand is so great he can barely keep up.